Simon King Wildlife on Wildflower Meadows

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I’m so delighted to see how quickly Wild Meadows has become a colourful carpet of wildflowers since our sewing the seeds here two years ago. Where last year we were treated to an explosion of annual species like poppy and cornflowers, this year has seen the perennials kick in; Ox-eye daisy, wild carrot and knapweed to name just a few. This profusion of floral magnificence is not only exquisite to look at, but it plays a very real and multi purpose role in the environment. Every plant stem is locking up carbon from the atmosphere, delivering water cycle services through roots and transpiration and, of course, providing food and sustenance to the legions of mini beasts and bigger creatures that depend on them. Any patch of land you are able to devote to wild flowers and native grasses will make a huge difference to the biodiversity on your patch too.

Alongside native flora, the single most important habitat you can introduce to your patch is a body of fresh water. From a small pond to larger water bodies, such as the one we dug here in Wild Meadows two winters ago, water is an essential ingredient for life and attracts a host of new species to even the smallest garden. Everything from the subtle sub aqua community like water beetles and boatmen, to the more showy pond stars like dragonflies and kingfishers may turn up making a massive positive difference to your patch. We will soon be making more ‘How To’ films on creating these habitats, so keep an eye on the website and our YouTube channel for updates. There’s really so much you can do to invite wild creatures to your garden, let us help take you on that journey…

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Why pollinating insects are important and how gardeners can help …

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I seem to be in a regular Bee-Thing at the moment – this is my 3rd successive bee-post :-). This piece, from the RHS (Royal Horticultural Society, is very helpful … Flying insects such as bees and hoverflies which visit … Continue reading