Mole Earth

https://i0.wp.com/www.slate.com/content/dam/slate/blogs/bad_astronomy/2013/10/22/shutterstock_mole.jpg.CROP.original-original.jpgThe moles woke up early this year, the frosts were still happening – well, the weather men say we’ve still got some, and maybe even some snow, to come. I went round the grass with a wheelbarrow last week collecting the earth the little darlings had dug up for me. It’s really special stuff. If you go look at molehills and compare them with the earth in one of your beds you’ll see the difference. I now have a lovely barrow-load of mole-earth, carefully covered so the rain we’re currently getting doesn’t saturate it and I’m storing it …

I use mole-earth, combined with some good sand and maybe a little compost, all mixed to one of my recipes, for sowing seeds.

The mole-earth has been processed by the mole(s). Moles are very solitary and territorial so although there were a helluva lot of mole hills they were likely made by just one or, possibly, two moles. Molehills is earth the mole has dug out from their tunnels when they build and repair them. They use the tunnels as worm-traps and can hear when a worm falls into their tunnel and will run along to grab and eat it.

The molehills run along the lines, the route of the burrow, but may not always be directly above the tunnel itself but rather at the ends of short side-tunnels. They are an excellent source of fine soil for use in gardening because of the way the moles’ claws sort of sift it as they dig it out. My uncle always used them so I learned way back in the 1950s and now permaculture advocates its use too. It really is good stuff, well worth you collecting 🙂

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